Hike #33 (n/a) – Cherokee Trail, Stone Mountain, GA

I’ve been here several times, Stone Mountain, Georgia.  I’ve walked up the mountain, rode the sky lift up and down and played in the mountain’s shadow.  The one thing I’ve not done will happen today, hike around the mountain.  The Cherokee Trail around Stone Mountain was very well marked, in granite no less, and easy to navigate.  The trail only had one steep climb that could be avoided by taking a connecting trail at the end.  The trail was roughly 5.5 miles.


Stone Mountain is known for its large relief carving of Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson and Jefferson Davis.  The carving has been somewhat controversial as of late.  Regardless of the political implications, I can’t help feel that this mountain has been damaged by the sculpture, not to mention the sky lift and laser show.  You can see in my first two pictures that the back side is very beautiful.  I feel we could all benefit long term if we just left nature alone.


The Cherokee Trail begins at the base on the hike to the top trail.  The trail proceeds through the forest until reaching the laser show event lawn allowing for a closeup view of the carving.      Once across the lawn, you enter the forest and work your way to a large lake.  Along the way, you pass many of the park’s sites, a gristmill, covered bridge and old stone quarry.  As I’ve said, this side of the mountain has had about as much damage as can be done.


From here, the real beauty emerges. The trail continues around the lake to the untouched side of the mountain allowing for some great views.  As you round the lake, you must decide to climb up the Cherokee Trail or take the flat trail extension back to the parking area.  This was really a nice trail.


Since we stayed the night, we had time for a couple of nice meals in Atlanta.  First up was the Bone Garden Cantina.  This place is hard to find but worth the effort.  They specialize in authentic Mexican food.


Second up was my single most favorite restaurant, bar none.  Barcelona Inman Park was my choice for Father’s Day.  They specialize in tapas and other Spanish dishes.  I’ve never had anything here that wasn’t perfect.  I highly recommend you give them a visit.  You can thank me later.

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Hike #32 (n/a) – Pigeon Hill Loop Trail


This 5.0 mile trail was also at Kennesaw Mountain Georgia.  I hiked this trail back to back with the Mountain trail making for a 10 mile and 94 flight day.  My feet reminded me that I’m still working my way up.  The trail itself had rolling hills but was notably more flat than the Mountain trail.


I noticed the complete lack of water on Kennesaw Mountain.  It made me wonder how so many men could be supported here.  This trail gave some of the answers.  The troop lines were closer together here, but it was clear to me that the Southern troop line extended off the mountain and past a significant stream.  This must have been to protect a water source for the men.

The number of people reduced steadily as you leave the main mountain area.  Still, the park was being heavily used for hiking, trail running and dog walking.  There were many alternate parking areas were you could have easy access to one trail or another.  It would take a little time to explore all this park has to offer.

Hike #31 (58G) – Kennesaw Mountain NMP


Kennesaw Mountain NMP was the location of a major battle in the taking of Atlanta during the Civil War.  The high ground was owned by the confederate army.  The full hike is 5.0 miles up the main mountain and the neighboring Little Kennesaw Mountain.  There are shorter or longer options available.  There is also a shuttle to the top if you don’t hike.  The park is free to the public and was very busy on this Memorial Day.


The hike starts at the gift shop and proceeds up the mountain at a challenging incline.  It is roughly a mile to the top.  Being Memorial Day, cannons were being fired at the base of the mountain as I made my way to the top.   Once there, you can see the position of four cannons and a scenic view of downtown Atlanta.  It made me wonder what the view would have been during the Civil War.  Past the Atlanta skyline, you can also see the distant Stone Mountain.


The confederate soldiers were at a disadvantage even holding the high ground.  The Southern cannons were inaccurate smooth bores while the Northern troops had highly accurate rifled cannons.  The entire mountain was covered in trenches built by Southern soldiers for protection.  Troop positions were noted on signs throughout the park.


The mountain itself was covered in large boulders that no doubt played a role in protecting Northern troops as they took the mountain.


The top of the mountain was covered in bluming cacti which are unusual to the area.


This is a lovely mountain hike that can be added to an Atlanta visit.  Still, the constant trench lines remind you of what happened at this place.  Many of the wounded from this battle and those that followed were transported by rail to a small, inadequate hospital beside Auburn University, my alma mater and current town.  Most to never recover.

Hike #30 (n/a) – Dismals Canyon


Dismals Canyon, about a hour north of Jasper, was one of my favorite hikes yet.  It is near the town of Phil Campbell, Alabama and continues the same rain forest feel as Natural Bridge.  I can’t imagine why this hike didn’t make the top 50 other than being short and on private property.


The location was nicely developed with a soda counter for lunch and a covered deck for resting.  The hike itself proceeds down about 5 stories into the canyon and continues 1.5 miles though spectacular scenery with a creek crossing or two along the way.

On this hike, do make a reservation one week in advance for the day/night combo.  The canyon is known for what they call “dismalites”, a type of glow worm if you will.  These are only found in a few places in the world.  My understanding is that this larvae lives about six months.  They weave a small silky web around themselves and glow to attract food sources into their webs.  It was explained that the larvae were the main reason for the notably fewer mosquitos in the canyon.  Still, bug spray and a red lens flashlight would be recommended.  On the .5 mile guided night tour, they take you to several darker areas were you can view the glowing larvae.  I was unable to capture this on my camera but borrowed a photo from their website.  We were told that Jessie James used this area as a hide out and was one of the first to write about the Dismalites.


I can only compare the view to looking at the night sky.  It was a very interesting treat.

We had some time to kill between our day hike and night tour.  We explored the nearby Bankhead National Forest and the Houston County Jail.  The jail is the only surviving log jail in Alabama.  It was very small and had convenient urination holes through the logs to the outside.  I guess they didn’t plan on holding many female prisoners back in the day.

Hike #29 (n/a) – Natural Bridge


Natural Bridge is found in the town of the same name just North of Jasper, Alabama.  It is a short 1.0 mile hike to one of Alabama’s neatest geographical features.  In fact, the hike is optional.  The bridge itself is only about 100 yards from the ticketing area.


The natural bridge was made by a plume of iron ore stretching over sandstone beneath the ocean that once covered Alabama.  When the ocean receded, the sandstone washed away leaving the iron ore bridge.


The hike passes the natural bridge and continues on a short loop through an equally impressive canyon.  The high, jagged rocks are also worth the visit.


I’ve never really explored this part of Alabama.  The entire area felt more like a rain forest than is typical of Alabama.  Don’t forget the bug repellent as the shady, moist conditions were perfect for mosquitoes.


For dinner, get off the main roads and go into downtown Jasper.  The old part of town was charming and filled with nice places to eat.  We ate at Warehouse 3 Nineteen.  Everyone enjoyed the meal as well as the warehouse charm.  You don’t want to miss it.